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Recommended Techniques For Noise Reduction

Recommended Techniques For Noise Reduction

Why Is Noise Reduction Such a Big Deal?

Noise is a big consideration in shooting pictures at night.  We push our cameras to capture the best details possible in dark conditions and the result can often be a little noisy.  What can you do about it?  Well, part of the answer lies in the shooting techniques but there's more on the post-processing side as well.  In the end, photographers have some good options available to them.

One of the challenges in using noise reduction is that there are so many options available to us.  In-fact, with all the different approaches available for reducing noise in nightscape images, it can be a downright confusing to know what to use when.  Darren and Mike got together and tested some of the most common methods available to determine what would be best to recommend and when.

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Recommended Lenses For Night Photography

Recommended Lenses For Night Photography

As students get ready for night photography workshops, they often ask the question, "If I could buy just one lens, are there any that would really help with my night photography?".  On this, I smile because there definitely is.  And the best part is the route I recommend doesn't break the bank.

In general, a wide-angle, bright lens with a minimum aperture of 2.8 would be ideal.  Good night photographs come from lots of other lenses, but in general, the low light sensitivity of an f/2.8 lens makes capturing the starry night sky a lot easier.

Improving Low-Light Capability With A Better Lens
Just like a new camera body can gain a few stops of low light sensitivity, it's well worth taking a look at how lenses can do the same.  As an example, changing from an f/4 lens (a lens with a minimum aperture of f/4) to an f/2.8 lens is equivalent to doubling the amount of light you have to work with - which is a big deal.  And a lens with an even wider aperture like f/1.4 can give you even more low light sensitivity...

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