Exposure

The Best Flashlight For Light Painting

The Best Flashlight For Light Painting

Background
A little while back, I posted an article where I reviewed the Brinkmann Dual Xenon Spotlight for light painting.  At that point, it was the best light I'd seen for night photography and it became my favorite "brush" for light painting.  The neutral to warm tint and the gentle, even cast of light worked well in a variety of light painting situations.

Problems With Availability
Not long after posting the article, supplies for the dual xenon spotlight dried up.  I had stirred the interest in people's minds but now they couldn't find the light.  As a result, I've had a pretty steady stream of people asking for an alternative light.  And while, my dual xenon spotlight still works great for me, I felt the need to help find a good light to recommend to others so I decided to take another look at which light would be a best choice for the night photographer looking to add some light painting...

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Mike's Super Long-Exposure Cheat Sheet

Mike's Super Long-Exposure Cheat Sheet

There are lots of different ways to shoot night photography.  We have the relatively short duration exposure (usually 30 seconds or less) where we get to see details in the night sky as points of light.  Then we have the star trail images where we shoot for a little longer and we stack multiple exposures so we get the stars to appear as trails in a way that's effective at reducing noise.  Both of these approaches open the shutter for a period of time that doesn't usually exceed 2 to 3 minutes - often less.  Part of the theory behind this is that multiple exposures are more effective at reducing noise than a single super long-exposure - even with long-exposure noise reduction enabled.

The Super Long-Exposure
In this article, I'm not letting the issue of sensor heat stop me from trying a really long exposure.  I'll make use of some long-exposure noise reduction to help address that issue.  I want to see what it looks like when I expose my shutter to light for 16 minutes or even 32 minutes.  The human eye is limited to ultra-short exposure times so we can't see much color at night.  But when the shutter is opened for half an hour, the results can be very interesting...

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